Blog

Welcome to my blog, where I'll occasionally share my thoughts on current events and issues in Fremont. I'm excited about launching this blog as part of my 2018 campaign - and hope you'll be a regular visitor to this space where I'll share my opinions about one of my passions: making Fremont the most vibrant, compassionate, and welcoming city and home it can be for all of our residents.


Councilmember Bonaccorsi Referral on 2nd Story Design Guidelines, and potential Moratorium on Tuesday's Agenda

COUNCILMEMBER BONACCORSI REFERRAL: Seeking Staff Evaluation and Recommendation on Neighborhood Preservation Actions

Over the past several weeks we have had speakers come before us during oral communications proposing changes to our municipal code related to neighborhood preservation: creating designated neighborhoods citywide or Neighborhood Conservation Areas (NCAs), revisiting and finalizing Zoning & Design Guidelines citywide for residential second story remodeling, and an interim urgency ordinance to impose a moratorium on residential second story remodeling pending adoption of any municipal code amendments. This referral seeks staff evaluation and recommendation on the various actions already taken by the city, those that remain to be completed, if any, and the various courses of action we can take regarding neighborhood preservation for problems that remain unaddressed.

View the July 17 meeting agenda


Councilmember Bonaccorsi's Cloverleaf Bowl Referral Unanimously Adopted By Council

On Tuesday, July 10th, at Councilmember Bonaccorsi's referral, the City Council was asked to initiate proceedings to consider adding Cloverleaf Bowl to Fremont’s historic register. The Fremont register is a “permanent public record…of historic resources.” Councilmember Bonaccorsi cited a recent report presented at a prior Council meeting on June 19 written by an architectural historian. The historian highlighted Cloverleaf Bowl as the only notable example of Googie roadside architecture prevalent in the 1950’s and 1960’s still standing in Fremont. Councilmember Bonaccorsi said that we might not know the term Googie, but “think the Space Needle in Seattle, Tomorrowland in Disneyland, and for those of us who grew up in the 60’s watching cartoons, the Jetsons!”

View the Council meeting.
Discussion of the referral begins at 35:00, with a review of the referral and comments by residents.
Councilmember Bonaccorsi's closing comments being at 1:51:38.

Hundreds of enthusiastic and passionate bowlers and other residents from 5 to 75, attended (including some who marched from Cloverleaf to the Council meeting!) to share their love of Cloverleaf Bowl, praising the Hillman's family-run business for their contribution to generations young and old in Fremont and beyond since 1963. Councilmember Bonaccorsi’s referral generated one of the largest crowds ever to attend our Council Chambers filling up not only the Council Chambers but spilling over to the lobby, an overflow room, and even standing room only outside the doors! After the Council’s unanimous vote in favor in favor of Bonaccorsi’s referral (in conjunction with a parallel referral by Councilmember Salwan), the Council directed staff to return to put Cloverleaf Bowl on the agenda at a Council meeting in September to initiate a process to consider adding Cloverleaf Bowl to Fremont’s register as a community landmark and historic resource.


Families Belong Together Rally - June 30, 2018

On June 30, a nation came together in support of #FamiliesBelongTogether to call for the immediate reunification for all children torn apart from their mothers and fathers. Fremont’s own #FamiliesBelongTogether rally brought more than 500 people together at Veterans Park next to the Fremont courthouse. The crowd was a microcosm of the diversity that is Fremont. I was honored to be asked to share my father’s memory as a WWII veteran who liberated a Nazi concentration camp in Nordhausen in 1945. I shared the stage at the rally with other community leaders and dignitaries. Many of them spoke from their own experience of vulnerability and discrimination  - whether as Latina women, members of the LGBTQ community, as African Americans, or Japanese Americans. To remember and to retell is to reclaim our shared humanity as we unite together in common cause with the families who have been forever traumatized in separation.

While we must be vigilant in protecting our borders, we can do so in a way that honors our greatest traditions as Americans. We can do both fairly with due process, yet adjudicate efficiently claims of asylum, while treating asylum seekers with the dignity, respect and basic human decency all of us - wherever we are born - are entitled as our birthright. And a due process that extends to all “persons” – not just citizens - under the 5th Amendment of our Constitution. 


Fremont to close portion of Morrison Canyon Road over safety concerns

Morrison Canyon closure: On Tuesday June 19, the Fremont Council authorized the closure of the mid-section of Morrison Canyon to vehicular traffic due to safety concerns.

This was a terrific example of our Fremont Public Works Department and our City Traffic Engineers listening to the concerns of residents. And a terrific example of a community engaged and mobilized reaching out to our City.

I was honored In January to be invited to a community meeting at the home of Moina Shaiq where more than 30 of her neighbors joined us to share their concerns with traffic on Morrison Canyon, including speeding, and resident cut-through between Mission Blvd., Niles Canyon and 680 (photo below).

At the Council meeting I shared my own very different experience of Morrison Canyon. I ran cross-country at Washington High School in the late 70's. Our training included running up (and down) Morrison Canyon - twice!

Read the article in the East Bay Times: Fremont to close portion of Morrison Canyon Road over safety concerns.


Press Release - June 21, 2018

Councilmember David Bonaccorsi Refuses to Accept Contributions from Developers

June 21, 2018, Fremont, CA: Today, community leader and City Councilmember David Bonaccorsi has taken a pledge not to accept campaign contributions from developers. Bonaccorsi has always made independent decisions for the good of all of Fremont.

“It is important to Fremont residents that we focus this campaign on the issues. Fremont needs Councilmembers—who are independent from each other—working collaboratively to find real solutions to the critical transportation, housing and public safety issues that impact each and every one of us on a daily basis,” said Councilmember Bonaccorsi, a lifelong District 3 resident who is seeking election this November.

Bonaccorsi continued, “I have devoted my life to Fremont through civic and community engagement— always focusing on what is good for Fremont. In this spirit, I have pledged not to accept developer contributions for the campaign. We have real problems to solve, and this campaign is focusing on the issues by offering real, sustainable solutions.” Contributions received from developers for this election have been returned.

Councilmember David Bonaccorsi has been actively engaged in the community for more than 30 years. David’s commitment to Fremont has included service on the Fremont Planning Commission, the Fremont Education Foundation, Abode Services, the Fremont Chamber’s Government Affairs Committee, Yes on Measures B and E (FUSD’s Bond Measures), Fremont’s Redevelopment Agency Oversight Board, Citizens for Better Community, and the Fremont Symphony Orchestra. Councilmember Bonaccorsi is currently a City Council representative to the City of Fremont/Fremont Unified School District Liaison Committee.

A lifelong resident of Fremont’s District 3, David attended Maloney Elementary, Glenmoor Elementary, Centerville Junior High, and Washington High School before earning both an undergraduate and then a law degree from Santa Clara University. For more information, go to Bonaccorsi4Fremont.com


28 Palms: Cows on Blacow?

Today I learned something about the 28 Palms neighborhood. The houses along Coco Palm and the first houses along the courts were built in an earlier phase.

The courts did not get completed with the remaining houses until a later phase because there was a farm with cows on Blacow that remained active for several more years!

(Random thought: were the cows called Blacows!?!)

Had there been a well organized opposition to any and all development then, there might still be a farm and Fremont’s population would be less than 100,000.

That was the population when my parents relocated with me in tow in 1961 when my Dad taught at what was then the only high school in Fremont - Washington High.


Reflections on compassion, unconditional love and acceptance

Many of us have seen a video of a woman in her SUV swear at Mr. Ahn, a Korean American veteran, for driving too slow on our Fremont streets, mocking him by making slant eyes and saying “Chinese is ugly.”

This video is going viral and I saw it again on KRON TV this morning.

Clearly, Mr. Ahn was the victim of this person who is hate filled and racist.

Her behavior must be condemned and is unacceptable.

Read more

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